An increasing number of teenagers have begun to abuse opioids in the United States. Some believe this may be because of its assessability.

It is not uncommon for teenagers to get their hands on the stuff by stealing it from their parents, an illegal act that parents could be held liable for. To protect yourself and your children from jail time and opioid abuse, follow these measures to ensure opioid prescriptions are stored in a safe, secure way.

Keep any prescriptions locked away

Parents may think their kids would never steal their prescriptions, but they should be extra careful no matter what. This is why many parents have invested in a safe to store prescription opioids. Only the parent knows how to open the box, so teenagers cannot get in even if they try.

Parents should also keep track of how much of their prescription they should have left. It is a good idea to keep a diary of when a person takes each pill, so he or she knows when there are fewer pills than there should be. 

Dispose of prescription opioids properly

Many people only use prescription opioids for a little while when they need to manage pain. When there are still some left, individuals should not flush them down the toilet. This can negatively impact the local water supply.

Instead, the pills should go in a trash bin with the bottle’s label removed. This prevents anyone from tying the drugs back to the patient who received them. It is also good to place the bottle in another box, so it remains hidden.

Talk to teens about the dangers of opioid use

Adults know they should not take more opioids than prescribed. However, teens may feel pressure from friends at school to get some for an upcoming party. When parents bring opioids into their house, they need to have a frank discussion of how dangerous they can be and how they will only take them until the pain goes away.